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January 1, 2017
Dear Coach,

Welcome to my Blog. Here you'll find essays I've written about coaching. Some of the questions I'm exploring are (1) What makes coaching work? (2) What helps coaches do their work well? (3) How do coaches continue to be masters of their profession? and (4) What the heck are those ICF coaching competencies, anyway?

My passion is helping coaches to be their best, so they can bring the best of coaching to their clients.

There's something here for all coaches, at all levels of experience. I’ll bet you'll learn something new, find a new perspective to consider, or just encounter a new way to say what you already know from experience. It’s all good, and (probably) good for you, too! .
You're welcome to browse - I'm sure you'll find something that resonates with your experience. You can also search on Categories and Tags for specific topics.

If you find something that you enjoy, please share with your colleagues and friends, and copy the link so you can find it again. Leave a comment if you’d like. You just might spur a new essay about something I’ve learned from you!

It's my privilege to offer my thoughts on coaching.. Enjoy your reading!

Sue McLeod, PCC

"Just the Facts" - about Mentor Coaching

Mentor Coaching Overview


What is Mentor Coaching (according to the ICF)?
 
  • Coaching on your coaching 
  • by an ICF credentialed coach at or above your desired credential level
 
Roles in a Mentor Coaching Relationship
 
Mentor Coach - person providing coaching on your coaching
Mentee - person receiving the mentor coaching
Client - person being coached for the purposes of evaluating the Mentee/Coach’s coaching
 
How is Mentor Coaching done?
 
Option 1: Using Recorded Coaching Sessions
  • Mentee records a coaching session with a Client
  • Mentee and Mentor Coach separately review the recording to assess coaching behaviors and identify focus areas for the mentor coaching
  • Mentor Coach and Mentee engage in a conversation about the coaching that includes
    • Feedback
    • Coaching for development
    • Action planning for improved coaching

Option 2: Live Coaching Sessions

  • Mentee coaches the Mentor Coach, or Mentor Coach listens to a live coaching sessin with another client
  • Mentor Coach and Mentee engage in a conversation about the coaching that includes
    • Feedback
    • Coaching for development
    • Action planning for improved coaching
Who is a Mentor Coach?
 
Expert in coaching competencies, effective coaching behaviors, experience in delivering effective coaching, and understanding the human traits that support or hinder effective coaching.
 
Partner playing an equal  role with the mentee in their development. In partnership you invite the mentee to create their own focus of learning, their own awareness, their own plans for improvement. In partnership, you share your expertise, observations, assessments, and feedback using a coaching approach designed to foster the learning and development of your menthe.
 
Why Use A Mentor Coach?
 
Mentor coaching is a great option when you're ready for a "personal trainer" approach to becoming a better coach.  Learn more HERE.
 
For More Information about Mentor Coaching
 
International Coach Federation (ICF) - Mentor Coaching Duties and Competencies
 
 Lees, Janet. "Mentoring and Supervision [Special Issue]." Choice Magazine Volume 10, no. 3 (September, 2012). 
 
Sue’s Blog Posts 
Who Needs a Mentor Coach?  September 2013
Are you curious? About your own coaching? August 2014
 
For More Information about ICF Coaching Competencies
 
ICF Website - search for:
  • Coaching Core Competencies
  • Competencies Comparison Table for ACC, PCC and MCC
  • PCC Competency Markers
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Coaching Presence: Are you with your client right NOW!

A Mentor Coaching Story


I was listening to a coaching recording, getting ready to give the coach feedback to support his development as a coach. “So far, so good”, I thought. Bob (not his real name) was asking open-ended and curious questions, he and the client were working on a clear coaching topic, and he seemed fully engaged in the conversation. 

As I continued listening, I noticed a subtle shift in Bob’s coaching. At the beginning, he seemed slightly behind the client, asking questions about what she had said a few seconds earlier and missing what she had just said. Not a big concern, but I started to be curious.  A little later, he was very connected to the client and focused on what she was sharing in the moment.  “Better”, I thought, but now I was curious to know what had changed for the coach.  In the last section, as the conversation shifted to designing action, Bob’s coaching shifted again. Now he was ahead of the client, expressing his ideas for her future and pushing her forward, while she was still clearly pondering the present moment and exploring what she was learning. 

 
 
Now I was truly curious - not about the client - but about the coach. What was going on  to cause Bob’s focus to shift so dramatically as the coaching conversation progressed?
 

When was the last time someone listened to your coaching
with curiosity
about you? 
 
When we coach, we’re in a private conversation with the client. All the focus is on the client.  So who is paying attention to the coach? Who is listening objectively, being curious about the choices the coach is making, and noticing patterns or subtle shifts in the coach’s language, emotions, and presence?
 
Without that objective view, how can we learn what we’re doing well, what we’re missing, and how we can continue to improve our coaching?  Relying on our client isn’t enough. Remember our clients aren’t experts in coaching. Relying on our own impressions of our coaching isn’t enough. We all have blind spots and selective memory.  And even additional coach training isn’t always enough. New knowledge about coaching or adding new coaching tools doesn’t always help us improve our day-to-day coaching.
 
Mentor Coaching fills that role. As defined by the ICF, Mentor Coaching is coaching on your coaching, based on actual recordings of you coaching a real client.  Your mentor coach listens to your coaching, makes note of what you’re doing well, and notices opportunities you missed, and patterns and habits you’ve developed. Then, in a coach-like conversation, gives you feedback and helps you to see where and how you can improve your coaching.
 

I like to think of a Mentor Coach as your “personal trainer”. Your Mentor Coach stands besides you, watching and listening, reminding you to do your best, encouraging you try something new, exploring what you need to push beyond your self-imposed limits.
 

Oh - and what about Bob?  In our Mentor Coaching discussion, I shared what I had noticed and we talked about what was happening for him during that session. At the beginning of the session, he was taking notes and this caused him to lag behind the client. In the middle, he relaxed and stopped taking notes.  Without thepen in his hand, he connected to the client and what she was saying. Near the end, he got excited about what was possible for his client. He disconnected and tried to pull her into his vision of the future. After our conversation, he saw that he could be a better coach by putting away the pen and paper, and setting aside his own excitement to stay connected to the client.  “Ahhh. Much better”, I thought.

 

If you're ready to look closely at your coaching, Mentor Coaching might be just right for you. Learn more here.

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Who Needs a Mentor Coach?

Mentor Coaching is a new requirement for some of the ICF credentials. But, who is required to have mentor coaching to fulfill the requirements?


To quickly answer that question, I've put together a handy guide in table form.  Find your current credential level in the first column, then find your next credential level in the top row. Find where they intersect and you'll find the mentor coaching requirement!  Simple!

ICF Requirements for Mentor Coaching
Information accurate as of Sept. 30 2013
 
Mentor Coach must hold credential at or above your certification level
 
Graduates from Accredited Coach Training Programs (ACTP)
 
 
Current Credential
Next Credential
ACC
PCC
MCC
None
name the mentor coach from your training program
none
none
ACC
10 hours
none
none
PCC
 
none
none
MCC
 
 
none
 
 
Portfolio Candidates (those who have not completed an Accredited Coach Training Program)
 
 
Current Credential
Next Credential
ACC
PCC
MCC
None
10 hours
10 hours
10 hours
ACC
10 hours
10 hours
10 hours
PCC
 
none
10 hours
MCC
 
 
none

The light blue boxes show the requirements for renewing your current certification level.

Does this make it clearer????  If you have questions, please leave a comment and I'll answer them as best I can.

And, I recommend that you bookmark the page on the ICF website that has the requirements for your next credential and check it periodically. Download the sample application to see exactly what information you're required to provide.

Requirements have changed and are expected to change again in Spring 2014.

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