sue mcleod master coach

Sue McLeod has over 10 years of experience as a coach, executive coach, coach instructor (trainer), mentor coach, and assessor. She believes that all coaches have the potential to be masterful. When coaches use the skills from their coach training, are aware of what gets in their way, and engage in practice and reflection about their work, they can tap into their best coaching self. Sue's coach training programs, retreats and mentor coaching provide safe spaces for coaches to be open and honest about the challenges they face, and motivation and support to overcome those challenges.

Sue holds a Professional Certified Coach (PCC) credential from the International Coach Federation (ICF), and a Certified Professional Co-Active Coach (CPCC) credential from the Coaches Training Institute (CTI). She is a faculty member for Georgetown University's Leadership Coaching Certificate Program, and teaches the Coaching Master Class (an online coach training program on the ICF Coaching Competencies). Sue is a frequent facilitator for ICF New England live events held in Portland, Maine, and is a PCC assessor for the ICF.

Sue lives in Maine and enjoys knitting, hiking, boating, and gardening. She volunteers with Big Brothers Big Sisters and the Kennebec Estuary Land Trust. In addition to her coach training, she does consulting work in public education, board development and facilitation for non-profits, and is a wedding officiant.

On Listening


I had come to believe that the act of being listened to was far more important than being in the documentary itself and could be transformative in people’s lives, because no one had actually ever listened to them. 
David Isay on why he moved from making documentaries to StoryCorps.
 
When I travel, I load up my IPad with podcasts from my favorite radio shows. I can listen while I knit or crochet, so it feeds my need to be doing something meaningful with my hands and my head.
 
This morning, I sat down with my crocheted scarf project and an episode of On Being that all coaches should find interesting. It’s an interview with David Isay, the founder of StoryCorps, and the topic is “The Everyday Art of Listening”.  
 

I was intrigued to find that this interviewer holds listening as a way to transform people’s lives and the conversations they have with each other.  So much of what he shared is aligned with how coaches listen and why we listen, and affirms the transformation that we bring to our client’s by the gift of our listening and by bearing witness to their stories.
 
He also shares how he finds intense listening to be challenging and hard work, and something that he can’t do all the time and with all the people in their lives.  This, too, should be familiar to coaches - it certainly is for me!
 
I encourage you to find a quiet moment to listen to this extraordinary interview.
 
http://www.onbeing.org - April 17 episode.
 

 

StoryCorps is a project that collects the stories of everyday people in audio recordings, which are stored in the Library of Congress.  http://storycorps.org
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A Season of Renewal for Your Coaching

It’s been a long winter!


Here in Maine, we’ve been shoveling snow and dealing with below freezing temps since December. I know from my friends along the East Coast and in the Midwest that it’s been a tough all over. Never ending snow, ice, cold, and cancellations. It’s hard to believe that spring is on it’s way!

One of the delights of my winter has been the PCC Master Class. There are three sessions in progress, each with just a few participants. I’ve been delighted by the level of commitment the students have shown to the process. They are willing to focus in on a specific competency and wrestle with what it means, what they are doing well, and where they need to improve. They share their coaching stories including their struggles and uncertainties - the moments that they’re not so proud of in their coaching. They learn from each other’s experiences and questions. And they design their own assignments to observe themselves more closely, and try new coaching moves.

I’ve witnessed each student grounding her knowledge, increasing her confidence, and deepening her awareness of what it means to be a masterful coach.

And, now, spring is coming. The birds are returning to the Maine landscape. The ice on the rivers is breaking up and flowing out to sea. The snow is melting, revealing the ground from which our summer grass and flowers will emerge.

It’s the perfect season to spruce up your coaching.

 

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Who Needs a Mentor Coach?

Mentor Coaching is a new requirement for some of the ICF credentials. But, who is required to have mentor coaching to fulfill the requirements?


To quickly answer that question, I've put together a handy guide in table form.  Find your current credential level in the first column, then find your next credential level in the top row. Find where they intersect and you'll find the mentor coaching requirement!  Simple!

ICF Requirements for Mentor Coaching
Information accurate as of Sept. 30 2013
 
Mentor Coach must hold credential at or above your certification level
 
Graduates from Accredited Coach Training Programs (ACTP)
 
 
Current Credential
Next Credential
ACC
PCC
MCC
None
name the mentor coach from your training program
none
none
ACC
10 hours
none
none
PCC
 
none
none
MCC
 
 
none
 
 
Portfolio Candidates (those who have not completed an Accredited Coach Training Program)
 
 
Current Credential
Next Credential
ACC
PCC
MCC
None
10 hours
10 hours
10 hours
ACC
10 hours
10 hours
10 hours
PCC
 
none
10 hours
MCC
 
 
none

The light blue boxes show the requirements for renewing your current certification level.

Does this make it clearer????  If you have questions, please leave a comment and I'll answer them as best I can.

And, I recommend that you bookmark the page on the ICF website that has the requirements for your next credential and check it periodically. Download the sample application to see exactly what information you're required to provide.

Requirements have changed and are expected to change again in Spring 2014.

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The road to mastery (or at least, to being more masterful than I am right now!)

What does it take to continue towards mastery?

I finished my coach training over 12 years ago. I've been a PCC for 10 years and since then have given feedback and support to many coaching students. And, of course, I've coached a lot too. A good training program, and lots of on-the-job training - and you'd think I could consider myself a master at my trade.

However, I've found that just doing the work of a coach, without close examination of what I'm doing and why, without upgrading my understanding of what good coaching should be, without honest feedback and support, doesn't really lead to mastery. It leads to experience, yes. But without that edge of continual improvement, deepening awareness, and the struggle inherent in moving beyond my limitations to new levels of performance, that experience doesn't always lead to better coaching.

So, I've gone back to basics and created a program I call PCC Master Class (now the Coaching Master Class). I offer it for others to participate in - and I've enrolled myself as well. So I'm not the all-knowing instructor, but a peer on the same journey of discovery and challenge.

The Coaching Master Class is based on an assumption that we've had a good foundation in what great coaching can be, and we have enough tools to use in our coaching conversations. So it's not about learning to coach.

The ICF Coaching Competencies give us a road map for both the "being" and "doing" of a coach. The PCC Master Class takes us into those competencies for the PCC level, and asks us to reexamine our understanding and use of them with our clients.

There's class discussion and then field work - which can include research and writing, observing a coaching demonstration, or examining your own coaching. We learn together, asking the questions that are on our minds now, using our collective experience and wisdom to seek the answers.

Class 1 was about Ethics and Professional Standards. I came away from that class is a deeper understanding of the underpinnings of our Code of Ethics, and a better way to evaluate those situations that just don't feel quite right so see what action is the best to take.

I'm excited to see what will develop as we dig deeper into each of the competencies in this journey to mastery.

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